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Authenticity could help your company profitably differentiate itself. Walter Hale explains.

If you want to influence creatives you’ve got to get into their space. So will you be exhibiting at events like 100% Design?

Large-format print companies could enjoy greater success through collaboration and an open approach to research and development argues Nathan Atkins, managing director of Papergraphics.

Stuart Maclaren of Your Print Partner discusses the pros and cons of fabric printing – and why it’s worth taking another look at getting involved.

How personalised T-shirts are in vogue thanks to the likes of YR Store’s interactive offering. Could you make a similar fashion statement?

YR Store’s interactive printed garment concept is catching the imagination of fashion retailers including the likes of Topshop and Selfridges. Now the system - that lets people create personalised clothing on easy-to-use touchscreen terminals then sends the finished design for printing within minutes via Epson SureColor printers - has global brands Nike and Google hooked.

BS 11000 is a standard for collaborative business relationships. Andrew Bury from validation company SGS UK argues why you should look towards becoming accredited.

“No man is an island” according to poet John Donne. And neither is any business if the trend towards collaboration is anything to go by.

The wide-format digital print sector is not particularly well represented by print industry trade bodies. Is that because more from the sector need to join up and make their voices heard? Bettine Pellant, new CEO of Picon, argues the case for membership to trade associations.

Say what you like about trade associations, but the UK has a lot of them. A quick Google search led me to one list containing well over 300 organisations, from the Adhesive Tape Manufacturers Association to the Zinc Development Association. Such volume and variety point to the perennial need businesses of all sizes have to seek strength in numbers, to build a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts.

Etailers are wanting to make human connection, and opening bricks and mortar stores. Walter Hale explores the phenomenon, which could well impact upon large-format print demand.

The high street is dead. We've heard predictions of the demise of bricks and mortar retail so often, most of us have come to assume it must be true. Yet if you look at the latest trends in American retail, it might be more accurate to say: the high street is dead! Long live the high street!